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  • Jenna Stevens

High Yielding GPA


It is that time of year when farmers spend a lot of time crunching numbers and analyzing their crop yields, seeing how their crops did overall and what they can do better next year to improve their operations and outcome. This past week I have also been analyzing numbers and outcomes, however, not just crops, it's college courses, too. It is that time of year when students begin registering for next year's classes.


Just like how farmers analyze what number and variety to plant, college students look over what level of courses they should take based on their major and previous classes taken. However, before making any decisions you need good solid advice. In college, it is your college advisor. In farming, this involves relationships with seed and fertilizer representatives. Each and every company just like every college or university professor claims to have the best product/classes available on the market. Once you find a good input sales rep or college advisor, you keep them because they help make your GPA or yields go up.


Then comes harvest and it turns out there is one field that had a low yield just like during the final test at the end of the year and scoring very low on an exam. Well last year I planted the seed number, biology, and the yields did not turn out as expected, the grade was low. It did not develop quite as it should just like a lower corn yield I had. I believe it missed a couple of critical rainfalls, just like I missed a couple of classes because I was gone for FFA. Then I get my first college grade on the curve and life is good! Who knew a grade could go up so fast? I average my total yield by total acres and realize I had a darn good year! This number-crunching stuff is pretty cool! I am anxious to start those new classes and I just registered for next semester. I am excited about planting different numbers and using new fertilizer configurations next year!


~ Kesley Holdgrafer




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